Midwife of the Week: Stacie Smith-Hunt

staciesmithhuntTrained by the midwives at The Farm in Summertown, TN Stacie Smith-Hunt, CPM, LM has been a part of their practice for more than fifteen years. She is also a massage therapist and certified herbalist, and teaches several workshops at The Farm. In 2013 Stacie founded Whole Woman Wellness and Education Center in St. Joseph, TN, where she offers midwifery services and well-woman care, and hosts community events and workshops. For more information on Stacie Smith-Hunt, visit http://wholewomanwellnesscenter.com/.

This Midwife of the Week post was written by Valerie Meharg. It originated on FoMM’s Facebook page and is archived here on our website for your continued enjoyment!

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Midwife of the Week: Debbie Pulley

debbiepulleyDebbie Pulley grew up in Hong Kong and began volunteering in the pediatric wing at her local hospital at the age of thirteen. Three years later she witnessed her first birth and continued to work in Labor and Delivery. Debbie finished high school in the United States and became a medical assistant to a pediatrician. When her friends began asking her to attend their unassisted births, Debbie sought out a midwife to train her and began an apprenticeship in 1981. Debbie is now a CPM and a Tennessee Licensed Midwife. She practices in Georgia at Atlanta Birth Care. She is active in the Georgia Midwifery Association, serves on the Board of Directors at NARM, and has been the Legislative Committee Chair for MANA. Debbie has been married to her husband Don since 1973 and they have two children. To find out more about Debbie Pulley, visit gamidwife.com;  for more information on the Georgia Midwifery Association, visit gamidwifery.org.

This Midwife of the Week post was written by Valerie Meharg. It originated on FoMM’s Facebook page and is archived here on our website for your continued enjoyment!

Midwife of the Week: Carol Nelson

carolnelsonCarol Nelson, LM, CPM, a midwife at The Farm, was an LPN when she started attending births in 1971. She became a Florida Licensed Midwife in 1982, and in 1995 also earned the CPM credential. Carol was a co-founder and instructor at the South Florida School of Midwifery. She wrote and lobbied for the Tennessee CPM law that was passed in 2000. The law established the Council of Certified Professional Midwifery of Tennessee, on which Carol sits. Currently Carol is the Midwifery Education and Advocacy Co-coordinator for MANA and also the Director of the Applications Department for NARM. Carol is also a devoted social and environmental activist. She serves on the Board of Directors of Plenty International, a non-profit organization started on The Farm to promote local food and water, energy, self sufficiency, and to provide disaster relief to communities in the US, Central America, and Africa. Carol is a founder of the Swan Conservation Trust, another nonprofit that protects and restores forests, waterways, and natural habitats in Tennessee. She is a mother to three daughters, all born at home. To learn more about Carol Nelson or her projects visit thefarmmidwives.org, http://swantrust.org/index.html, or http://plenty.org/.

This Midwife of the Week post was written by Valerie Meharg. It originated on FoMM’s Facebook page and is archived here on our website for your continued enjoyment!

Midwife of the Week: Ina May Gaskin

ina may gaskinA name ubiquitous both inside and outside the birthing world, Ina May Gaskin has been referred to as “the mother of authentic midwifery.” In 1971, Ina May and her husband opened The Farm in Tennessee, which houses one of the first and largest birthing centers in the United States. The Farm is known for its incredibly high number of natural births including twin and breech, and its low hospital transfer rate. Gaskin introduced to the U.S. a traditional Guatemalan technique to resolve shoulder dystocia, the entrapment of a baby’s shoulder behind the mother’s pubic bone. The technique of having the mother position herself on hands and knees to open the pelvic outlet has since been dubbed the “Gaskin Maneuver” and is now a standard strategy for midwives and many obstetricians. The Farm’s popularity has only increased over the past decades; it offers trainings and CEUs including midwife and doula, water shiatsu, and an herb workshop. Ina May has written several books, among them the seminal works Spiritual Midwifery and Ina May’s Guide to Childbirth, which have helped begin to demystify and normalize natural/home birth. If you haven’t seen her TED Talk, watch it here: http://inamay.com/.

Midwife of the Week posts, written by Sirene-Rose Lipschutz, originate on FoMM’s Facebook page and are archived here on our website for your continued enjoyment!